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Curriculum Spotlight
WOMEN & LEADERSHIP

BEYOND THE SYLLABUS

Women & Leadership

As women move into higher levels of leadership, it is essential to recognize, understand and transform gender challenges into career opportunities.

The M.A. in Communication & Leadership Studies program prepares women in leadership by guiding students through their own interests in contemporary women’s issues. And, by educating current leaders on such issues giving them the skills to empower women to confidently move into leadership positions.

Issue such as:

  • Latina mentoring for leadership
  • Gender differences in the computer mediated communication in the workplace
  • Media representation of female leaders
  • Body image and self esteem
  • Sex trafficking
  • Cyberbullying
  • Issues of combating domestic violence

Women & Leadership Elective

COML 513

  • Check back for dates or contact a Student Services Coordinator

This course will look at gender differences in leadership styles and efficacy as well as specific issues women face in attaining and retaining leadership positions. Through readings, discussions, and projects that critically examine images and gender stereotypes of women leaders, the course is designed to give students practical skills they can use to be better communicators and leaders.

  • Learn how to use language and images effectively to frame important issues for social change
  • Discuss current debates in popular culture about women in leadership
  • Understand Feminine and Masculine speech patterns that lead to misunderstandings
  • Learn how Nonverbal communication impacts gender performance
  • Develop effective feminist leadership styles
  • Learn skills to effectively present important messages in a variety of mediums


Faculty Presentations and Publications in Women & Leadership

Heather_Crandall_webDr. Heather Crandall

Bryant, R., Crandall, H., Cunningham. C., & Yerion, K. (2014). We Can Do Better: Unlocking the Clubhouse Through our Classroom Practices. The Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges, 30(1), 173-175.

2012   Crandall, H. Violence Associated With Political Rhetoric. The Multimedia Encyclopedia of Women in Today’s World by Mary Zeiss Stange, Carol K. Oyster, J. Geoffre. Sage Publications. ISBN: 9781412995962

2012   Caputo, J. S. & Crandall, H. The Intercultural Communication Cultural

Immersion Experience: Preparing Leaders for a Global Future. Journal of

Leadership Studies Special Issue: Symposium on Educating and Developing Global Leaders.

2015   Crandall, H. M. Panel on Can Women in Corporate America Lean in To Succeed? Organization for Research on Women and Communication Interest Group. Listen Closely to this story: narrative Coherence in Lean In.

2014   Bryant, R., Crandall, H, Cunningham, C. & Yerion, K. Tutorial, We Can Do Better- Unlocking the Club House through Our Classroom Practices. Northwest Regional Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges.

2013   Cunningham, C. Crandall, H., & Barbour JoAnne. Gender Communication and Leadership Workshop Series. Topics included Gender and Technology, Gender and Power, Gender in the Workplace, Gender and Nonverbal Communication, Gender and Romantic Relationships. Gonzaga University.

2016   Guest speaker at the Women in Leadership: Consciousness and Confidence symposium in Seattle, Washington.

2016   Currently working on an edited collection about women, communication and leadership to be published by the International Leadership Association

 

Spring 2015 Faculty and Staff PortraitsDr. Carolyn Cunningham

Cunningham, C. (in press). “Men are like Bluetooth, Women are like Wi-Fi”: What feminist technology studies can add to the study of ICTs. Journal of the Northwest Communication Association

Cunningham, Carolyn (2013). “16 and not pregnant: Teen-created YouTube parody videos and risk behavior.” Journal of Children and Media. doi:10.1080/17482798.2014.863479

Cunningham, Carolyn. (2011). “Girl Game Designers.” New Media & Society. 13 (8). Pgs. 1373-1388. doi:10.1177/1461444811410397.

Cunningham, Carolyn. (2003). “Emerging Academics: Thoughts on Becoming (and not becoming) Mothers.” Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering. Fall/Winter 2003, Vol. 5, No.2. pp. 118-131.

Cunningham, Carolyn & Crandall, Heather (2014). Social media for social justice: Cyberfeminism in the Digital Village. In Susan V. Iverson & Jennifer H. James (eds). Feminist Community Engagement: Achieving Praxis (pp. 75-92). New York: Palgrave.

Cunningham, Carolyn (2007). “Creating Girl Engineers: Strategies from Two National Programs.” Ingelore Welp (ed.) Gender in Engineering Problems and Possibilities. New York: Peter Lang.

Cunningham, Carolyn, ed. (2012). Social Networking and Impression Management: Self-Presentation in the Digital Age. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Phillips, D.J. and Cunningham, C. (2007) “Queering Surveillance Research,” in O’Riordan, K. and Phillips, D.J. (eds.) Queers Online: Media Technology and Sexuality. New York: Peter Lang.

Cunningham, Carolyn (2014). “Women’s Centers.” The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Gender and Sexuality Studies. Ryan, J . Michael. Ed.

Cunningham, Carolyn (2012). “Video Games—Representations of Femininity.” Encyclopedia of Gender in Media. Kosult, Mary and Golson, J. Geoffrey. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Bryant, R., Crandall, H., Cunningham. C., & Yerion, K. (2014). We Can Do Better: Unlocking the Clubhouse Through our Classroom Practices. The Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges, 30(1), 173-175.

2013   Cunningham, C. Crandall, H., & Barbour JoAnne. Gender Communication and Leadership Workshop Series. Topics included Gender and Technology, Gender and Power, Gender in the Workplace, Gender and Nonverbal Communication, Gender and Romantic Relationships. Gonzaga University.

2016   Currently working on an edited collection about women, communication and leadership to be published by the International Leadership Association

Women and Leadership Bootcamp

A 3-day Women and Leadership Bootcamp concentrating on gender-focused leadership skills is currently in development for this summer.

Enrollment in an academic program at GU is NOT required to take this workshop.  It is open to everyone.  Women, men, varying career levels, or students are welcome.  The more diverse the group, the more opportunity for dynamic discussions.

  • Check back for upcoming dates or contact a Student Services Coordinator

2014 Opus Prize Recipient, Sr. Teresa “Tesa” Fitzgerald, speaks to Women & Leadership class. Pictured here with Dr. Heather Crandall (left) and Dr. Carolyn Cunningham (right).

sister teresa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lisabrownLisa Brown
Lisa J. Brown is currently the Chancellor of Washington State University Spokane. She was previously a Washington legislator. A Democrat, she represented the Spokane-based 3rd district from 1993 to 2013.

 

 

joshmisnerJosh Misner, Ph.D.
Dr. Misner is an award-winning communication and leadership professor and mindfulness researcher, whose research focuses on the impact of mindful presence, or paying careful attention on purpose, particularly with respect to fathers and their families.

 

dori-sonntagDori Sonntag

Dori Sonntag is an executive coach and strategist with more than 18 years of professional experience leading and coaching sales, operations, fundraising and marketing teams towards the achievement of record-breaking goals. Utilizing a strengths-based approach, Dori works with executives to maximize their leadership potential, while leveraging the skills and talents of a greater team to create a culture of accountability and success.

Read about Dr. Cunningham’s research on girls and videogames.

fix games fix the gender gap photoFix Games, Fix the Gender Gap

Inlander, 2012

The gap between men and women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math is well documented, and there’s no shortage of academic theories on how to fix it.

But Gonzaga professor Carolyn Cunningham argues that the solution could be found on an Xbox or Wii.

If girls were more interested in videogames, the theory goes, they would be more likely to go into fields like computer programming or game design. So the industry has poured money and time into trying to sell games to girls. Nonprofit groups hold workshops to teach girls more about videogames.

But it’s only sort of working. Even though girls are increasingly playing videogames — on consoles, PCs and phones — they still only make up about 10 percent of the jobs in the videogame industry.

Cunningham thinks she may be figuring out why. She says workshops and games designed to grab girls’ attention seem to be reinforcing old stereotypes.

Read full article

Related Articles

For more information on how you can participate in women & leadership studies with the M.A. in Communication & Leadership Studies program, contact Dr. Heather Crandall or Dr. Carolyn Cunningham.

Unfold Your Authentic Self

Hear how the Gonzaga’s M.A. in Communication & Leadership Studies program gave graduate Libby Laveson, Head of Internal Communications @Twitter, the skills and confidence to purse her passions both personally and professionally.

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